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dc.contributor.advisorŞentürk, Recep
dc.contributor.authorCebeci, Ahsen Nimet
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-31T09:23:21Z
dc.date.available2017-10-31T09:23:21Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.date.submitted2017
dc.identifier.citationCebeci, A. N. (2017). The holistic approach to knowledge and education in Imām Abū Hāmid al-Ghazālī’s system of thought. (Unpublished master's thesis). Ibn Haldun University Alliance of Civilizations Institute, İstanbul.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12154/54
dc.identifier.urihttps://catalog.ihu.edu.tr/yordambt/yordam.php?aDemirbas=0002730
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this thesis is to explore the means of knowledge acquisition put forward in Imam Abu ?amid al-Ghazali’s theory of knowledge, with particular focus on those elements that would, today, be deemed prelogical in light of modern epistemic convictions. I will argue that such means are not prelogical or irrational, as they have been described in several places, but are the natural epistemic dimension of an extensive and sophisticated metaphysical theology that differs significantly from the metaphysical outlook (or lack thereof) that motivates such pejorative labeling. I will further argue that Imam al-Ghazali’s inclusion of these means is not a symptom of intellectual weakness or ritualistic bias, but a valuable illustration of the wholistic nature of Islamic thought, in which the metaphysical, the physical, the epistemological, and the ethical are all treated as inextricable facets of existence whose separating boundaries are, in many cases, impossible to delineate. Thus, Imam al-Ghazali’s conviction that seekers of knowledge should conduct their search through metaphysical, spiritual, and ritualistic means does not detract from, but rather lends coherence and strength to his theory of knowledge, which has become canon within the vast intellectual tradition of his faith.en_US
dc.description.tableofcontentsINTRODUCTION -- Imām al-Ghazālī, 4 -- Biographical Background, 4 -- A Mission of Revival, 7 -- An Indelible Impact, 11 -- Disclaimers -- Representation is Relative, 13 -- Caution around Linguistic and Terminological Usages, 13 -- Imām al-Ghazālī’s Writings are Motivated by his Agenda of Revival, 15 -- “Is” Statements that are not Ontological, 16 -- CHAPTER ONE: THE SIGNIFICANCE OF KNOWLEDGE IN ISLAM -- 1.1. The Normative Nature of Knowledge and Learning, 20 -- 1.1.1. In Islam, all Acts are Normative, 20 -- 1.1.2. Knowledge and Learning are Normative Because they are a Means to Proper Conduct -- in all Other Acts, 20 -- 1.1.3. The Act of Seeking Knowledge as Worship, 22 -- 1.1.4. The Act of Seeking Knowledge as an Ethical Pursuit, 23 -- 1.2. Knowledge as Both Means and End, 25 -- 1.2.1. Imām al-Ghazālī’s System of Valuation, 25 -- 1.3. Why We Ought to Examine Educational Philosophy in Islam, 27 -- 1.3.1. Islamic Theories of Knowledge and Education Remain Largely Ignored in Modern -- Academia, 27 -- CHAPTER TWO: COSMOLOGICAL CONTEXT -- 2.1. The Intertwined Corporeal and Spiritual Realms, 29 -- 2.1.1. Movement Between the Corporeal and Spiritual Realms Constitutes the Path of -- Religious Life, 29 -- 2.2. The Heart as the Seat of Knowledge, 30 -- 2.2.1. Four Part Terminological Matrix of the Soul, 31 -- 2.3. The Passage of Knowledge into the Heart, 33 -- 2.3.1. Imām al-Ghazālī’s Spectrum of the Extra-mental and Mental Existence of Intelligibles --, 33 -- 2.3.2. When the Pattern Breaks: Divine Inspiration, 35 -- 2.3.3. Another Way of Understanding the Process of Learning: the Metaphor of the Heart as -- Mirror, 35 -- 2.3.4. Still Another Useful Metaphor: the Entry of Intelligibles into the Heart from Two Doors --, 36 -- CHAPTER THREE: IMĀM AL-GHAZĀLĪ’S THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE -- 3.1. What is Knowledge?, 38 -- 3.1.1. There are Countless Ways in which Knowledge is Understood, 38 -- 3.1.2. True Knowledge is Knowledge of God, 39 -- 3.2. The Division of Knowledge into the Knowledge of Conduct and the Knowledge of -- Unveiling, 39 -- 3.2.2. Imām al-Ghazālī’s Works Primarily Take into Hand the Knowledge of Proper Conduct --, 42 -- 3.3.1. Imām al-Ghazālī’s Criteria in Ranking the Sciences, 43 -- 3.3.2. The Instrumental Sciences, 44 -- 3.4. Metaphors Used to Describe Knowledge, 44 -- 3.4.1. Knowledge is Life, 44 -- 3.4.2. Knowledge is Light, 46 -- 3.4.3. Knowledge is Happiness, 46 -- 3.5. The Nobility of Knowledge, 47 -- 3.5.1. Mankind’s Intellect Sets him Apart from all of Creation, 47 -- 3.5.2. The Relationship between Knowledge and Prophecy, 48 -- CHAPTER FOUR: THE SOURCES OF KNOWLEDGE -- 4.1. The Primary Source of Knowledge, 50 -- 4.1.1. God is the Primary Cause of Knowledge Entering the Heart, 50 -- 4.2. The Secondary Sources of Knowledge, 51 -- 4.2.1. Reason, 51 -- 4.2.2. Revelation, 52 -- 4.2.3. Knowledge Must be Sought through Both, 54 -- 4.3. Some of the Tertiary Sources of Knowledge, 57 -- 4.3.1. Knowledge is Taken from Men, 57 -- 4.3.2. Knowledge is Taken Wherever it is Found, 60 -- 4.3.3. The Place of Empirical Knowledge in Imām al-Ghazālī’s Epistemology, 61 -- CHAPTER FIVE: HOW TO DERIVE KNOWLEDGE FROM ITS SOURCES -- 5.1. Knowledge is Gained by Maintaining the Proper Intentions, 65 -- 5.1.1. Flawed Intentionality Prevents One from Gaining Knowledge, 65 -- 5.1.2. Flawed Intentionality Leads to the Removal of Knowledge from the World, 67 -- 5.1.3. Flawed Intentionality Causes One’s Knowledge to Count Against One, 68 -- 5.2. Knowledge is Gained through Study and Reflection, 69 -- 5.2.1. Asking Questions, 69 -- 5.2.2. Debate and its Many Dangers, 70 -- 5.2.3. Beginning Study with What is Easily Understood, 72 -- 5.2.4. Avoiding Distraction, 74 -- 5.3. Knowledge is Gained Through Righteousness and Good Character, 75 -- 5.3.1. Ethics as a Means of Knowledge Acquisition, 75 -- 5.3.2. Spiritual Purification as a Means of Knowledge Acquisition, 76 -- 5.3.3. Knowledge is Gained Through Reverence for Knowledge, 80 -- 5.3.4. Knowledge is gained through Humility, 84 -- 5.4.2. Moderation in Everything, 87 -- 5.4.3. Little Speech, 90 -- 5.4.4. Little Sleep, 92 -- CONCLUSION -- A Poor Choice of Words, 93 -- The Term is Pejorative, 93 -- Imām al-Ghazālī’s Means of Knowledge Acquisition as Causally Appropriate within his -- Metaphysic, 95 -- Imām al-Ghazālī’s Response, 95 -- One’s Ignorance of a Phenomenon does not Entail its Non-existence, 95 -- Spiritual Realities have Properties and Effects, 97en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherİbn Haldun Üniversitesi, Medeniyetler İttifakı Enstitüsüen_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen_US
dc.subjectImām al-Ghazālīen_US
dc.subjectholistic worldviewen_US
dc.subjectTheory of Knowledgeen_US
dc.subjectKnowledge Acquisitionen_US
dc.subjectPrelogicalen_US
dc.titleThe holistic approach to knowledge and education in Imām Abū Hāmid al-Ghazālī’s system of thoughten_US
dc.typemasterThesisen_US
dc.departmentİHÜ, Medeniyetler İttifakı Enstitüsü, Medeniyet Araştırmaları Ana Bilim Dalıen_US
dc.authorid0000-0003-0106-5562en_US
dc.relation.ihupublicationcategory0en_US
dc.relation.publicationcategoryTezen_US
dc.contributor.institutionauthorCebeci, Ahsen Nimet


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